MUST READ: New Development in George Floyd/Derek Chauvin Case


Most of the nation witnessed the traumatic events of Monday, May 25, 2020. What happened in a Powderhorn Park neighborhood in Minneapolis, Minnesota was a tragedy. But was it murder? To truthfully convict Officer Derek Chauvin of murder, the act must have been proven intentional.

It was not. The outcry from the radical left fueled a racial upheaval across our nation not witnessed in decades. Without going into the mind of Derek Chauvin at the exact moment he was holding a repeat criminal on the ground, it is impossible to prove mindset.

Nevertheless, Derek Chauvin was found guilty and sentenced on two counts of murder. Chauvin could have received up to 40-years for three charges, second-degree murder, third-degree murder, and ultimately the only possible true charge, second-degree manslaughter.

Even worse, prosecutors asked for a minimum 30-year sentence from Judge Peter Cahill because of mitigating history. There wasn’t a single piece of mitigating history that warranted such a harsh maximum sentence request for Derek Chauvin.

However, Judge Cahill still handed down a 22-and-a-half-year prison term for Chauvin, despite defense attorneys arguing for probation. No one logically ever expected probation. However, to see Derek Chauvin’s act as accidental manslaughter was not unrealistic.

After Joe Biden spewed his opinions all over the mainstream media, Derek Chauvin never stood a chance. Sure, he did something wrong. How wrong it was to hold George Floyd on the ground with his knee is open for debate.

Many insist that George Floyd’s drug-induced condition was a contributing factor in his death. This fact was minimally considered when Chauvin was charged and convicted of two counts of murder. Murder is an act with at least some level of forethought.

No one could argue that Derek Chauvin woke up that Monday morning aspiring to find a man of color and kill him. That’s simply illogical. However, behind the screams from the radical left, amid anarchy and violence in our city streets, America watched as Derek Chauvin became a scapegoat to quell racial unrest.

Chauvin is rightfully appealing his sentencing and conviction. The defense attorney’s pleas to move the trail outside of the biased venue of Hennepin County were denied. Chauvin’s defense also asserts numerous other incidents where the judge abused good discretion and made legal errors.

Even if the harsh murder conviction were justifiable, which they were not, Chauvin should have been looking at a maximum of 12-years in prison. Not over two decades behind bars. The charges did not fit the crime, and the sentencing further made a scapegoat out of Chauvin.

Logical legal reasoning insists that Derek Chauvin didn’t even know he was committing a crime. He could never have known George Floyd’s condition would precipitate his death. Chauvin was applying accepted law enforcement protocol.

It was not a premeditated act. What happened on May 25, 2020, was not murder. It was horrific and deserved to be legally scrutinized. However, the conviction and sentencing of Derek Chauvin were not justified.

The radical left, to promote an unrealistic racial narrative, used the Derek Chauvin trial and sentencing. He is not a murderer. Did he overstep his bounds and contribute to George Floyd’s death? That trial would have at least been an honest attempt at justice.

Derek Chauvin’s trial was not. When someone dies as the result of an action, it warrants manslaughter consideration. That case would bear merit in a court of law. However, Derek Chauvin is right in his appeal. Derek Chauvin was a scapegoat, who was overcharged and over-sentenced.

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